Craze Or Crazy? What You Need to Know about Maple Water


Green smoothies and protein shakes, vitamin water and coconut water . . . these drinks seem to be all the rage, but science suggests that they may be little more than expensive water.

Maple water, a newcomer to the field of “superdrinks,” is collected from trees just like maple syrup. When the sap collects, it is usually boiled until it becomes our beloved syrup. Maple water is produced when companies skip the boiling and bottle the sap. The result is a product that’s refreshing and natural; a very diluted version of the syrup at 98% water and only 25 calories for every serving. In fact, the nutrition label only has one ingredient: maple water.

As the new kid on the block, science doesn’t have much to say yet about maple water. No studies have been conducted that compare its effectiveness or benefits with water or all of the many alternatives. But from the nutrition facts, some things are easy to discern. First of all, maple water’s few calories do come from sugar. Natural and unprocessed sugar, but sugar nonetheless. Second, maple water contains no fat and no sodium, which leaves it as a viable option for those keeping an eye on fat intake and heart health.

The only nutritional benefits boasted by maple water are its trace amounts of calcium and potassium and its rather high amounts of manganese. While maple water will only provide you with just 1-2% of your needed potassium and calcium for the day, it does offer 30% of the recommended manganese intake in just one serving. This could potentially benefit you if you are suffering from osteoporosis, thyroid disease, anemia, or PMS.

Even Trader Joe’s admits of its own product that “the jury’s still out on whether or not this beverage actually provides any true health benefits to people,” but it would appear that there’s no harm in drinking maple water either. If you’re looking for a boosted version of water, something with a few extra nutrients and a little more flavor, maple water might be the perfect drink for you.

Sources:
traderjoes.com/digin/post/maple-water
webmd.com

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1 Comment

  1. Coconut Ed
    November 15, 2015
    Reply

    Maple sap water right from the tree without processing has real value. Once processed and made for shelf life the nutrient content and health benefits are marginal compared to direct from the tree.
    We are in an age where plant derived waters are on the rise.

    For a Planet Plant!

    Ed Hartz
    aka
    “Coconut Ed”

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